Uptown Nights & Carnegie Hall City Wide: Tia Fuller

May 16, 2019 7:30pm – 9:30pm

Lead support for Carnegie Hall Citywide is provided by the Howard Gilman Foundation.

Additional support is provided by the A. L. and Jennie L. Luria Foundation.

Multi-instrumentalist, composer, and bandleader Tia Fuller is one of the leading performers on the jazz scene, as well as a member of Beyoncé’s touring band. An instrumental triple threat—she plays alto and soprano saxophone, and flute—she is a much sought-after performer who has played with such jazz luminaries as Wycliffe Gordon, Don Byron, Jon Faddis, and Nancy Wilson. Not only a stellar performer, Fuller is also a dedicated educator and full-time professor at the Berklee College of Music.

Tickets: RSVP

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Location
Harlem Stage Gatehouse
150 Convent Avenue at West 135th Street
New York NY 10031 US

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First Saturday Jam Session with David Durrah

March 2, 2019 2:00pm
April 6, 2019 2:00pm
May 4,2019 2:00pm
June 1, 2019 2:00pm

Jazz For Curious Listeners

Calling jazz musicians of all ages! Grab your instrument, bring a chart, and build your chops with Harlem icon David Durrah.

Don’t play an instrument? Saturday Sessions are a space for musicians and fans alike to soak up Harlem’s vibrant live music scene.

$10.00 Suggested Donation

Saturday Sessions

In keeping with Harlem’s tradition of artist salons and after-hours performances, our monthly Saturday Sessions provide an informal creative space for musicians to connect and play with mentors.

Tickets: $0-$10 / for museum members

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Location
The National Jazz Museum in Harlem
58 West 129th Street
New York NY 10027 US

Desert Island Discs with Regina Carter

February 26, 2019 7:00pm

Conservatory-trained and bandstand-tested, violinist Regina Carter addresses her instrument, as per her faculty web-page at Manhattan School of Music, “not simply as an improvisational vehicle, but a passport to unexpected realms. . .a Rosetta Stone that unlocks the doors to a myriad of cultures, sounds, and worlds apart.” Carter is the first African-American to play the legendary 1743 Guarneri Del Gesu violin owned by Nicolo Paganini, as documented on her 2003 album Paganini: After a Dream. She’s recorded hardcore jazz with Kenny Barron and fellow Detroit native Barry Harris, and Latin Jazz with Eddie Palmieri. She’s played “down and dirty fiddle” style on tour with Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra’s presentation of Blood on the Fields, and done sessions with such pop music icons as Aretha Franklin, Mary J. Blige, and Dolly Parton. On recent albums, Carter has explored traditional African music (Reverse Threads), Americana Roots music (Southern Comfort), and the oeuvre of Ella Fitzgerald (Ella: Accentuate The Positive). In short, Carter refuses to place herself in boxes of any stripe, addressing all the idioms she navigates on their own terms of engagement, telling her stories with deep soul and intelligence.

ABOUT DESERT ISLAND DISCS:
In the fall of 2015, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem debuted its version of Desert Island Discs. It’s modeled on an iconic BBC radio show, extant since 1942, which invites eminences from various walks of life to choose—and discuss—the eight records they would bring for a stay on the apocryphal desert island. For the Jazz Museum’s expanded version curated and hosted by esteemed journalist Ted Panken, the presenters are jazz musicians, who will present a cohort of music, of any genre, that was essential in the formation and evolution of their musical personality.

Tickets: $0-$10

More Info:

Location
The National Jazz Museum in Harlem
58 West 129th Street
New York NY 10027 US

Desert Island Discs with Ken Peplowski

February 5, 2019 7:00pm

Ken  Peplowski sounds the way (Benny) Goodman might if he had kept evolving, kept on listening to new music, kept refining his sound, polishing his craft, and expanding his musical purview into the 21st century,” the eminent music writer Will Friedwald declared in the Wall Street Journal in 2012. It’s an accurate assessment of the 59-year-old virtuoso, who has made it his business during his 40 years as a professional jazz musician to address any context — the Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman orchestras, Dixieland, swing and bebop combos, avant-garde jazz and 20th century classical music — at the highest level of craft and artistry, singing his own song, as Lester Young used to say, not only on clarinet, but also tenor saxophone and alto saxophone. The Cleveland native has documented all of these stylistic food groups, historical and contemporary, on 50+ recordings as a leader, most recently Enrapture (Capri). “It’s not that big a stretch between Jimmie Noone and someone like Marty Ehrlich,” Peplowski commented in the liner notes for an earlier album, Grenadilla. “It’s important to remind the audience it’s all a continuous line of music.

ABOUT DESERT ISLAND DISCS:
In the fall of 2015, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem debuted its version of Desert Island Discs. It’s modeled on an iconic BBC radio show, extant since 1942, which invites eminences from various walks of life to choose—and discuss—the eight records they would bring for a stay on the apocryphal desert island. For the Jazz Museum’s expanded version curated and hosted by esteemed journalist Ted Panken, the presenters are jazz musicians, who will present a cohort of music, of any genre, that was essential in the formation and evolution of their musical personality

Tickets: $0 – $10

More Info:

Location
The National Jazz Museum in Harlem
58 West 129th Street
New York NY 10027 US

Rescheduled: Desert Island Discs w/ David Murray

January 29, 2019 7:00pm

Now 63, tenor saxophonist-bass clarinetist-composer David Murray, perhaps the most recorded improviser of his generation, has elicited strong responses throughout his 45-year career. Most recently, he’s been touring behind the album Blues For Memo, a collaboration between his quartet (Orrin Evans, piano; Jaribu Shahid, bass; and Nasheet Waits-drums) and poet-vocalist Saul Williams. It’s the most recent in a string of releases that includes a collaborative project with Cassandra Wilson and Ishmael Reed; a fully staged opera dedicated to the iconic Afro-Russian poet Alexander Pushkin; another opera about Harlem numbers king Bumpy Johnson with a libretto by the late Amiri Baraka; big band and string music for Cuban ensembles; and for bands comprised of musicians from Guadeloupe (Creole), Yonn-de, and Gwotet), Senegal (Fo Deuk Revue), and the Black American Church (Speaking in Tongues).

A native of California’s Bay Area, Murray moved to New York in 1975, after a few years at the University of California-Claremont, where he studied and performed with Stanley Crouch, as well as the likes of Arthur Blythe, Bobby Bradford, John Carter, James Newton, and Butch Morris. He moved to New York in 1975, and quickly established himself as one of the jazz capital’s busiest musicians, establishing a worldwide fan bass through the lyric swagger and raw edge of his tonal personality. He moved to Paris in 1995, but took an apartment in Harlem several years ago.

Conversant with tenor saxophone vocabulary spanning Paul Gonsalves and Coleman Hawkins to Albert Ayler, as well as a comprehensive array of Afro-diasporic dialects, he’s the ideal Desert Island Disk presenter.

ABOUT DESERT ISLAND DISCS:
In the fall of 2015, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem debuted its version of Desert Island Discs. It’s modeled on an iconic BBC radio show, extant since 1942, which invites eminences from various walks of life to choose—and discuss—the eight records they would bring for a stay on the apocryphal desert island. For the Jazz Museum’s expanded version curated and hosted by esteemed journalist Ted Panken, the presenters are jazz musicians, who will present a cohort of music, of any genre, that was essential in the formation and evolution of their musical personality.

Tickets: RSVP

More Info: 

Location
The National Jazz Museum in Harlem
58 West 129th Street
New York NY 10027 US

Roberto Roena

Y Su Apollo Sound
with Sammy González, Tito Cruz, Carlos Santos, and Endel Dueño

January 26, 2019 8:00pm

Roberto Roena is one of the most renowned salsa creators in Puerto Rico and around the world. He is famous for his participation in the Combo of Cortijo, El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico, Fania, Puerto Rico All Stars and Legendary Apollo Sound.

He returns to the Lehman Center to celebrate more than 55 years of splendor, rhythm, and flavor of his musical talent! Special guests and Original Singers will include Sammy González, Tito Cruz and Carlos Santos, the voices behind great hits like Tu Loco, Loco, (his first hit), Mi Desengaño, Lamento de Concepción, Cui Cui, Avísale a Mi Contrario, Marejada Feliz, Peldaño, “Regaño al Corazón, and Progreso, and the legendary Master Timbalero Endel Dueño.

Tickets: VIP $100, $65, $55, $50

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Location
Lehman Center for the Performing Arts
250 Bedford Park Blvd West
Bronx NY 10468 US

Carnegie Hall Citywide: Lorraine Klaasen

January 29, 2019 | 7:00pm – 9:00pm

Please note that this event, originally scheduled to take place on Monday, February 18, has been rescheduled for Tuesday, January 29.

Lorraine Klaasen is South African music royalty. The daughter of renowned jazz singer Thandi Klaasen, she honors the vibrant musical traditions that were born in the townships: the poor, racially segregated urban areas of South Africa’s apartheid era. Influenced by such South African legends as Miriam Makeba—the inspiration for her 2013 JUNO Award–winning tribute album—Klaasen makes the music her own with her impassioned singing and dynamic stage presence.

Cost: Free Event. RSVP required: schomburgcenter.eventbrite.com 

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street
New York NY 10037

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